Posts Tagged ‘Vitamin C’

10 Holiday Health Tips

 

 

Want to stay healthy this holiday season? No colds or flus. No gaining ten pounds that never seem to come off. Sound impossible? Not at all. Let’s do it differently this year. If you’ve been following my posts for a while, you know I’m all about prevention. Once you’ve gained the weight or gotten sick, it’s much harder to recover than not going through it at all.

Here are a few helpful tips to be in top shape the whole year.


1) Take at least 500 mg of vitamin C a day.

 

2) Eat garlic- It’s a natural antibiotic and tastes delicious.

 

3) Sweat- It’s a great way to get toxins out.

 

4) Dab your wrists or neck with lavender oil, because it has antibiotic properties.

 

5) Eat before going to parties. Fill up on healthier options before being tempted to eat only sugar, white bread, and animal products.

 

6) Contribute some healthy options of your own to holiday meals.

 

7) Take a B complex for hangover prevention.

 

8) Let yourself totally enjoy when you are indulging. Feeling guilty releases stress hormones leading to weight gain. So, if you’re going to have one too many cocktails or that second piece of pie, just accept it and enjoy every bite. Not that I’m condoning doing this, but we all know it’s going to happen.

 

9) Drink a glass of water after each alcoholic beverage.

 

10) Get moving. It’ll help keep the weight off, reduce stress, and boost your immunity. Walk. If you live where it’s too cold and wet to get outside or even to the gym. Run up and down your stairs a few times. Do some jumping jacks. Buy a mini trampoline and jump for 20 minutes.

 

See how simple and fun prevention can be? Start a new holiday tradition this year. The tradition of health.

 

Live natural. Live well.

Heather

Boosting Your Immunity

How many days have you called in sick this year? How many special occasions have you missed, because you or a family member is sick? Again? The stress of our every day lives taxes the body. Bad food, late nights, little to no sleep, caffeine and sugar addiction, and high stress levels every day would wear out anyone. Chinese medicine and proper nutrition can help you stay healthy & recover quickly from colds and the flu.

A lot of people have weakened immune systems due to the fast paced lifestyle most of us lead. This makes them prone to colds and the flu. Having a lower immunity can also make you prone to being really sick for longer periods, especially when compared to someone who is relatively healthy. It’s rare to just get a case of the sniffles.

Improving one’s immune system, so you don’t get sick is ideal. This process can start immediately and have a long-term impact on one’s health. These modalities are also highly effective for those with HIV/AIDS.

Once a person is sick, the sooner treatment is administered, the quicker the recovery. Similar treatment protocols are administered with someone who is sick or just starting to come down with something. The types of herbs and points used do change, but daily acupuncture treatments and herbs are essential. The use of Chinese medicine gets rid of an infection without the side effects of antibiotics. Naturally treating an infection doesn’t suppress the contagion, but helps the body heal itself. So the bug doesn’t come right back.

A few, easy preventative measures: Eat lots of garlic, take vitamin C daily, and avoid dairy and sugar (sorry!). These simple steps may help you:

* avoid feeling miserable

* have more energy

* save money

*no more calling in sick (unless you want to)

* avoid side effects of antibiotics

* thoroughly enjoy your holidays

Live natural. Live well.

Heather

Pumpkins Aren’t Just for Decoration

It’s that time of year! Pumpkins everywhere. Not only are they are great decoration for Halloween, they’re great for you. One of my fondest childhood memories is carving up a pumpkin in anticipation of dressing up and all the sugar I was about to consume. Luckily, now I look forward to all the pumpkin I get to eat instead.

Health Benefits of Pumpkin

Pumpkin is naturally low in calories and rich in health-promoting nutrients, including:

Fiber

* reduces bad cholesterol levels, thus reducing the risk of heart disease
* controls blood sugar levels
* promotes healthy digestion
* encourages weight loss

Potassium

* Balances fluid levels
* promotes strong bones
* necessary for energy production
* maintains healthy blood pressure

Alpha-carotene & Beta-carotene

* improves vision & reduces risk of cataracts
* reverses sun damage to the skin & slows the aging process
* is an anti-inflammatory
* prevents tumor growth
* boosts the immune system
* protects against heart disease

Vitamins C

* boosts immunity
* reduces high blood pressure and heart disease
* regulates cholesterol levels

Vitamin E

* slows aging by protecting the skin from sun damage
* reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and certain cancers

Magnesium

* promotes a strong immune system
* strengthens the bones
* supports heart function

Pantothenic acid/vitamin B5

* balances hormone levels
* manages stress levels

My favorite pumpkin dish is a really simple soup- Just cook some vegetable broth, 4-6 cups of pumpkin, onion, garlic, a little curry powder and a potato or two on simmer for 20 minutes. Add coconut milk at the end. Puree in blender and serve. Delicious!

Pumpkin Seeds


Pumpkin seeds are high in vitamin E, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, and are an excellent plant-based source of omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids. The seeds protect against prostate cancer and prevent osteoporosis.

One way I love to eat pumpkin seeds is to slightly toast them, put them in a blender with silken tofu, nutritional yeast, and Bragg’s amino acids. This makes a great dip any time of year.

So this year, make it a new tradition to use the whole pumpkin and make healthier choices during the holiday season.

Live natural. Live well.

Heather

Popeye was almost right

But he should have eaten fresh spinach instead of canned. It’s a great source of iron, which increases the health of your blood, especially red blood cells. Red blood cells in turn feed your muscles, among many other things, and in turn, gives you energy and strength.

The absorbed iron is transported as plasma ferritin and stored in liver, spleen, bone marrow and kidney. When red cells are broken down, the liberated iron is reutilized in the formation of new red cells. Iron is necessary for oxygen transport and cell growth by helping the blood transport oxygen from the lungs to the tissue cells where it is needed.

Are you getting enough iron?

Iron deficiency symptoms include: Pale skin & nail beds, fatigue, irritability, dizziness, weakness, shortness of breath, sore tongue and mouth, light headed, brittle nails, decreased appetite (especially in children), headache, weakness. Other symptoms include heartburn, gas, vague abdominal pains, numbness and tingling in the extremities, heart palpitation, and sores at the corners of the mouth.

What causes the malabsorption of iron?

Deficiency Vitamin C, because Vitamin C aides in iron absorption. In men and postmenopausal women, anemia is usually due to blood loss associated with ulcers, the use of aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDS), or colon cancer.

Iron is mostly absorbed from duodenum (part of the intestines) and upper small intestine. So if you have any digestive issues or food sensitivities, you could be at risk for anemia.

Phytate, which is found in some whole grains and legumes, can limit iron absorption. Soy, which is a good vegetarian source of iron, contains phytate and certain proteins that interfere with iron absorption. Other foods that obstruct iron absorption include coffee, tea (including some herbal), cocoa, calcium, fiber and some spices.

Some iron loss occurs naturally. The total daily iron loss of an adult is about 1 mg and about 2 mg in menstruating women.

 

Daily Requirements of Iron

Children, men and women according to age have different nutritional needs. Please see chart below for guidelines.

Children
7 mos – 1 yr 11 mg         1 yr – 4 yrs 7 mg

4 yrs – 8 yrs 10 mg          9 yrs – 13 yrs 8 mg

Men
14 yrs – 18 yrs 11 mg        19 yrs + 8 mg

Women

14 yrs – 18 yrs 15 mg

19 yrs – 50 yrs 18 mg
51 + yrs 8 mg

Pregnant 27 mg

Lactating 14 yrs – 18 yrs 10 mg
19 + yrs     9 mg

 

Sources of Iron

Food                         Iron in mg             Food                       Iron in mg

Black beans              7.9                               Tofu                         4.6
Garbanzos                6.9                               Lima beans             4.5
Pintos                       6.1                              Lentils                     6.6
Navy                         5.1                                Split peas               3.4
Soybeans                 8.8                           Kidney Beans         5.2

Fresh Peas              2.9                            Tempeh                    2.2

 

Vegetables (1 cup cooked)

Spinach                   6.4                             Kale                       1.8
Beet greens            2.8                             Acorn squash         1.7
Swiss chard            4.0                             Brussels sprouts   1.7
Tomato juice           2.2                             Potato w/skin         1.4
Butternut squash    2.1                              Beets                      1.0

Fruit

Prune juice (1 cup)  10.5                            Dates (10)              2.4
Dried peach             5 3.9                            Prunes                   1.8
Raisins, ½ cup        2.6                          Strawberries, 1 cup   1.5

Grains (¼ cup dry)
Rice bran                     10.8                    Wheat bran/germ      1.9
Quinoa                         4.6                     Cream of wheat           8.1
Millet                            3.9                      Oat or cornmeal         0.7

Seeds (approximately ¼ cup)

Pumpkin seeds           4.0                    Sunflower seeds          2.4

Hemp Seeds              13.6

Miscellaneous

Blackstrap molasses  3.2                  Brewer’s yeast, 1 tbs        1.4
Tahini 2 tbsp               2.7                   Cashews ¼ cup               2.0

 

So next time your at the farmers market, pick up some some kale and spinach and add them to your black bean chili or next soup. Or top your green salad with pumpkin seeds.  Not only will it taste great, but you’ll feel more energized.

Live natural. Live well.

Heather

Acupuncture Facelifts

Aesthetic acupuncture is the use of acupuncture and electric stimulation to reduce wrinkles and improve skin elasticity of the face and neck. The needles are placed along the wrinkles and then small cables are attached to some of those needles. Very low levels of electricity flow through the needles and into the skin for 15 to 20 minutes. There is a slight vibration, which is nearly painless. Some describe it as a ‘rain patter’ or light drumming on the skin.

As we age, we lose collagen, the substance that keeps our skin looking plump and dewy.  Electric stimulation and acupuncture work in conjunction to stimulate the skin’s collagen, actually causing it to enlarge.  This new, fuller collagen then fills the crevices and creates a lifting affect on the skin.

The number of treatments and the end result depend on several factors. The overall condition of your health is most important. It may be necessary to strengthen your body before using aesthetic acupuncture for optimal results. If you’re weakened or depleted, your skin may only slightly respond – or not at all.  Chinese herbs would be prescribed to help strengthen the body.

Another factor that affects aesthetic acupuncture is the skin tone that’s being treated.  People with darker complexions tend to respond more quickly to treatment than those who are pale.  A good result is also dependent upon the condition of the skin.  If the skin is damaged by sun, lifestyle, or genetics, the result might not be as great as that in healthier skin.

The recommended number of treatments is two times per week for a total of eight weeks. “Touch-ups” will be required every three to six months.  The initial visit includes a complete consultation as well as the first treatment, taking approximately one to one-and-a half hours. Each subsequent treatment will be around 30 minutes.

There is no guarantee that everyone will see significant changes. The above-mentioned conditions are very important.  Following post treatment instructions is also necessary. It is important to drink plenty of water, avoid coffee, alcohol, and cigarettes. It is less invasive than surgery and you can keep the extra dollars in your pocket.

Like us on Facebook!
Follow us on Twitter!
Links of Interest











Pre-order the paper book now.

This smart, interesting, easy-to-read guide will have you healthier and happier than you’ve ever been. A great synthesis of East meets West, Fix Your Mood with Food covers it all.” —Rory Freedman, Co-author of Skinny Bitch

Get it from the following locations:

Amazon

Indie Bound

Barnes & Noble