Posts Tagged ‘strength’

14 Tips to a Healthier You

How many days of work have you called in sick? How many days have you just not felt that great? Do you know a coworker who is always sick? Stress taxes the body. Bad food, late nights, no sleep, overexertion, & different time zones regularly or even every day would wear out anyone.

A lot of people have weakened immune systems due to stress, poor diets, travel, overuse of antibiotics, lack of sleep, and overwork. This makes them prone to colds and the flu. Having a lower immunity can also make you prone to being really sick for longer periods, especially when compared to someone who is relatively healthy. That’s why travelers tend to get really sick. It’s rare that they just get a case of the sniffles.

Improving someone’s immune system so they don’t get sick is ideal. Taking care of yourself on a daily basis, along with acupuncture, taking Chinese herbs, massage, Reiki, supplements, and aromatherapy, along with dietary changes, have a great impact on one’s health.

 

Some of the signs that you’re overstressed

 

*Poor sleep, Anxiety, Brain fog,  Acne
* PMS, Low libido, Weight gain
* High blood pressure/cholesterol, Excessive evening hunger
* Hair loss, Exhaustion, Impaired immunity
* Slow healing, Salt/sugar cravings, Caffeine addiction

Once a person is sick, the sooner treatment is administered, the quicker the recovery. Similar treatment protocols are administered with someone who is sick or just starting to come down with something. The use of Chinese medicine gets rid of an infection without the side effects of antibiotics. Treating an infection naturally doesn’t suppress the contagion, so that it doesn’t just come right back.

Tips

 


These simple, easy to follow tips can help you and your loved ones stay healthy & recover quickly from colds and the flu.

1) Take at least 500 mg of vitamin C a day. Great sources include dark leafy greens, broccoli, bell pepper, lemon, and persimmon. C also aids in iron absorption.

 

2) Supplement with acidopopholus/probiotics to encourage healthy bacteria to grow in your digestive tract. Thus, boosting your immune system and improving your mood.
3) Eat garlic. Garlic is a natural antibiotic and tastes great.

 

4) Drink two tablespoons of raw apple cider vinegar daily to help with allergies, nausea, asthma, fat, migraines, cholesterol, blood pressure, fungus, flu, and acne.

 

5) Eat turmeric in soups, curries, and smoothies. It’s a natural antibiotic, reduces cough, detoxifies, reduces inflammation, improves skin, and aids in digestion.
6) Take a vitamin B complex for reducing stress and improving energy.
7) Ginger is a natural antiviral, reduces inflammation and pain, kills parasites, eliminates mucus, and aids. Digestion.

 

8) Eat your antioxidants to prevent illness of any kind.

 

Prunes      Kale       Raisins     Spinach
Berries     Brussels sprouts    Broccoli
Beets        Plums    Onion       Corn

 

9) Eat plant based Omega 3s for brain function and regulating hormones. Sources include walnuts, hemp, flax, kale, seaweed, chia seeds, and acai berries.

 

10) Essential oils for stress- Lavender, Neroli, Chamomile, Cypress, Frankincense, Basil, Jasmine, Valerian, Chamomile, Lemon, Rose

 

11) Drink water. Drink half your weight in ounces daily. More, if you are flying.

 

12.) Avoid dairy and sugar. They cause inflammation, fatigue, and weakened immunity.

 

13) Avoid caffeine because it exaggerates body’s response to stress.

 

14) Put Epsom salts in your bath for detoxification and muscle tension.

 

Following these easy to follow tips will lead to a much happier and healthier you. Stay calm, vibrant, and full of energy with out breaking the bank.

Live natural. Live well.

Heather

Popeye was almost right

But he should have eaten fresh spinach instead of canned. It’s a great source of iron, which increases the health of your blood, especially red blood cells. Red blood cells in turn feed your muscles, among many other things, and in turn, gives you energy and strength.

The absorbed iron is transported as plasma ferritin and stored in liver, spleen, bone marrow and kidney. When red cells are broken down, the liberated iron is reutilized in the formation of new red cells. Iron is necessary for oxygen transport and cell growth by helping the blood transport oxygen from the lungs to the tissue cells where it is needed.

Are you getting enough iron?

Iron deficiency symptoms include: Pale skin & nail beds, fatigue, irritability, dizziness, weakness, shortness of breath, sore tongue and mouth, light headed, brittle nails, decreased appetite (especially in children), headache, weakness. Other symptoms include heartburn, gas, vague abdominal pains, numbness and tingling in the extremities, heart palpitation, and sores at the corners of the mouth.

What causes the malabsorption of iron?

Deficiency Vitamin C, because Vitamin C aides in iron absorption. In men and postmenopausal women, anemia is usually due to blood loss associated with ulcers, the use of aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDS), or colon cancer.

Iron is mostly absorbed from duodenum (part of the intestines) and upper small intestine. So if you have any digestive issues or food sensitivities, you could be at risk for anemia.

Phytate, which is found in some whole grains and legumes, can limit iron absorption. Soy, which is a good vegetarian source of iron, contains phytate and certain proteins that interfere with iron absorption. Other foods that obstruct iron absorption include coffee, tea (including some herbal), cocoa, calcium, fiber and some spices.

Some iron loss occurs naturally. The total daily iron loss of an adult is about 1 mg and about 2 mg in menstruating women.

 

Daily Requirements of Iron

Children, men and women according to age have different nutritional needs. Please see chart below for guidelines.

Children
7 mos – 1 yr 11 mg         1 yr – 4 yrs 7 mg

4 yrs – 8 yrs 10 mg          9 yrs – 13 yrs 8 mg

Men
14 yrs – 18 yrs 11 mg        19 yrs + 8 mg

Women

14 yrs – 18 yrs 15 mg

19 yrs – 50 yrs 18 mg
51 + yrs 8 mg

Pregnant 27 mg

Lactating 14 yrs – 18 yrs 10 mg
19 + yrs     9 mg

 

Sources of Iron

Food                         Iron in mg             Food                       Iron in mg

Black beans              7.9                               Tofu                         4.6
Garbanzos                6.9                               Lima beans             4.5
Pintos                       6.1                              Lentils                     6.6
Navy                         5.1                                Split peas               3.4
Soybeans                 8.8                           Kidney Beans         5.2

Fresh Peas              2.9                            Tempeh                    2.2

 

Vegetables (1 cup cooked)

Spinach                   6.4                             Kale                       1.8
Beet greens            2.8                             Acorn squash         1.7
Swiss chard            4.0                             Brussels sprouts   1.7
Tomato juice           2.2                             Potato w/skin         1.4
Butternut squash    2.1                              Beets                      1.0

Fruit

Prune juice (1 cup)  10.5                            Dates (10)              2.4
Dried peach             5 3.9                            Prunes                   1.8
Raisins, ½ cup        2.6                          Strawberries, 1 cup   1.5

Grains (¼ cup dry)
Rice bran                     10.8                    Wheat bran/germ      1.9
Quinoa                         4.6                     Cream of wheat           8.1
Millet                            3.9                      Oat or cornmeal         0.7

Seeds (approximately ¼ cup)

Pumpkin seeds           4.0                    Sunflower seeds          2.4

Hemp Seeds              13.6

Miscellaneous

Blackstrap molasses  3.2                  Brewer’s yeast, 1 tbs        1.4
Tahini 2 tbsp               2.7                   Cashews ¼ cup               2.0

 

So next time your at the farmers market, pick up some some kale and spinach and add them to your black bean chili or next soup. Or top your green salad with pumpkin seeds.  Not only will it taste great, but you’ll feel more energized.

Live natural. Live well.

Heather

Boosting the Immune System

A weakened immune system not only makes the body prone to colds and flues, but also extends the amount of time symptoms remain, especially when compared to someone who is relatively healthy. That’s why some people tend to get really sick when they do get sick. It’s rare that they just get a case of the sniffles.

Life’s stresses tax the body. Combine that with bad food, late nights, lack of sleep, and overexertion and even the strongest would be worn out. Traditional Chinese medicine helps to keep you healthy or recover quickly if illness hits.

Improving someone’s immune system so they don’t get sick is ideal. Daily acupuncture, taking Chinese herbs, massage, Reiki, supplements, and aromatherapy, along with dietary changes, have a great impact on one’s health. This practice is also used for those with HIV/AIDS.

Once a person is sick, the sooner treatment is administered, the quicker the recovery. Similar treatment protocols are administered with someone who is sick or just starting to come down with something. The types of herbs and points used do change, but daily acupuncture treatments and herbs are essential. Unlike antibiotics, Chinese medicine doesn’t just suppress the contagion, it actually expels it so that the illness doesn’t come right back. In addition, there are no side effects with Chinese medicine like there are with the use of antibiotics.

In the long run, my therapeutic approach will improve your immune system and in turn, prevent you from getting sick. But if you, I’ll have you feeling well in short order!

Patient testimonial:

I can’t remember the last time I got sick, maybe 5 years ago. I used to be bedridden with the flu up to four times a year. I know it’s from the combination of treatments from Dr. Lounsbury. She does acupuncture, herbs, massage and Reiki to help me stay on top. I can now consider myself totally healthy.
- Joan M., Dancer

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